Friday, June 22, 2012

Surface Supplied Diving for Public Safety Dive Team Leaders and Incident Commanders

Hosted on: June 9, 2012, NASAR 2012 Annual Conference, Lake Tahoe, CA

Surface Supplied Diving for Public Safety Dive Team Leaders and Incident Commanders







Public Safety Dive Team Leaders and Incident Commanders whom are responsible for a dive team need to understand the capabilities of the surface supplied equipped dive team. Professional surface supplied diving is a team effort. It’s of paramount importance that the topside team (dive team leaders, incident command and staff), as well as the divers, are all trained and qualified to do their job.
Many diving operations are in shallow water, less than 80 feet (24 meters) and often are conducted in remote areas. Prior to the availability of lightweight, portable surface supplied diving equipment, the most common method that was used for diving and working in these remote areas was SCUBA. Working underwater with SCUBA diving equipment is less efficient and poses several safety risks for working public safety divers.
The primary differences between Surface Supplied Diving and SCUBA Diving include the following: using voice communication, having unlimited breathing gas supply, the use of surface support and they are tethered to the surface.




Public Safety Dive team leaders, with appropriate budgets, need to consider acquiring surface supplied diving systems and training for safety reasons, especially in limited visibility. These systems are another resource in the Incident Commanders tool box.



For assistance preparing and scheduling training for your Team contact ERDI or Omni Divers Underwater Services, L.L.C. directly.

http://www.tdisdi.com/wpsite/erdi/ or call 207.729.4201

Surface Supplied Diving Techniques for Public Safety Diving

Hosted on: June 9, 2012, NASAR 2012 Annual Conference, Lake Tahoe, CA

Surface Supplied Diving Techniques for Public Safety Diving

Professional surface supplied diving is a team effort. It’s of paramount importance that the topside team, as well as the divers, are all trained and qualified to do their job. The safety and success of a diving operation is only as good as the weakest link on the team. Divers will often make serious mistakes and increase their risks on the job when a tender or communications person is not alert and responding when needed.

Many diving operations are in shallow water, less than 80 feet (24 meters) and often are conducted in remote, hard-to-get-to areas. Prior to the availability of lightweight, portable surface supplied diving equipment, the most common method that was used for diving and working in these remote areas was SCUBA. Working underwater with SCUBA diving equipment is less efficient and poses several safety risks for working divers.


The primary differences between Surface Supplied Diving and SCUBA Diving include the following: using voice communication, have unlimited breathing gas supply, use surface support and they are tethered to the surface.

Public Safety Dive teams with appropriate budgets need to consider using surface supplied air for safety reasons especially in limited visibility.

For assistance preparing and scheduling training for your Team contact ERDI or Omni Divers Underwater Services, L.L.C. directly.

http://www.tdisdi.com/wpsite/erdi/ or call 207.729.4201

SDI High Altitude Diving - Lake Tahoe

Hosted on: June 10, 2012, High Altitude Instructor and Diver Specialty Courses, Sand Hollow State Park, Lake Tahoe, NV

High Altitude Instructor and Diver Specialty Courses, Sand Hollow State Park, Lake Tahoe, NV

Introduction
The purpose of this course is to acqnuaint a diver with the necessary procedures and knowledge to safely dive at altitudes above sea level.



Open Water Execution
1. Two dives are required with complete briefs and debriefs by the instructor
2. Dive plans must include surface interval, maximum no-decompression time, etc. to be figured out and logged



Outline and Discussion Points
1. Why we do this Type of Diving?
2. Dive Tables as They Relate to Altitude Diving
    a. DCIEM Tables
    b. B├╝hlmann Tables
    c. Cross Corrections to United States Navy (USN) Tables
3. Computers
    a. Computer’s capability and usage
4. Calculations Based on Cross Corrections to USN Tables
    a. Usage
        i. Actual depth of dive
        ii. Altitude of dive site
        iii. Ascent rate is adjusted
    b. Examples of problems
    c. Last dive and travel at higher altitudes
5. Correction of Depth Gauges and Computers
    a. Gauges designed for 1 atmosphere (ATM)
    b. Capillary depth gauge will reflect the actual depth
    c. If there is any doubt use measured down line
6. Hypoxia During Altitude Diving
7. Levels of Altitude:
    a. 300 metres / 1000 feet
    b. 1200 meters / 4000 feet, etc

For assistance preparing and scheduling training for your Team or individual divers and instructors, please contact SDI or Omni Divers Underwater Services, L.L.C. directly.

http://www.tdisdi.com/wpsite/sdi/ or call 207.729.4201