Saturday, December 29, 2007

Welcome to YMCA SCUBA!


Welcome to YMCA SCUBA!

Our Style of Instruction

The history of national dive training in the United States began with the development of the YMCA Scuba Program. As divers and instructors, we have dedicated ourselves to the quest for ever-better ways to teach others to enjoy the underwater world. That is our heritage. Throughout the history of sport diving, YMCAs have maintained unsurpassed standards. Those standards have changed as our knowledge and depth of experience have changed. Others have followed. That is our record.

The first instructors, certified in Chicago, IL, in 1959, provided the dedication and knowledge that became our tradition. We now have trained divers throughout the world and helped to form other dive-training organizations. Throughout our history we have worked tirelessly to improve diver safety and enjoyment with a parallel sense of responsibility toward the underwater world which we explore.

Our accomplishments are known. Today, as in the past, no sport diver in the world is better trained than the individual who has met the high standards of YMCA Scuba.

In the 40+ years since our inception, YMCA Scuba has continued to provide the highest level of community-oriented education for divers and instructors based on the YMCA mission: To put Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind, and body for all.

YMCA SCUBA

For Current Information, or to contact YMCA SCUBA

YMCA of the USA
SCUBA Program
101 N. Wacker Drive
Chicago, IL 60606
(800) 872-9622
(312) 279-4492 fax

E-Mail: scuba@ymca.net

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

Monday, December 24, 2007

A BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION ! ! !

You are cordially invited to a Birthday Celebration!!!

Guest of Honor: Jesus Christ

Date: Every day. Traditionally, December 25 but He's always around, so the date is flexible...

Time: Whenever you're ready. (Please don't be late, though, or you'll miss out on all the fun!)

Place: In your heart.... He'll meet you there. (You'll hear Him knock.)

Attire: Come as you are... grubbies are okay. He'll be washing our clothes anyway. He said something about new white robes and crowns for everyone who stays till the last.

Tickets: Admission is free. He's already paid for everyone... (He says you wouldn't have been able to afford it anyway... it cost Him everything He had. But you do need to accept the ticket!!

Refreshments: New wine, bread, and a far-out drink He calls "Living Water," followed by a supper that promises to be out of this world!

Gift Suggestions: ; Your life. He's one of those people who already has everything else. (He's very generous in return though. Just wait until you see what He has for you!)

Entertainment: Joy, Peace, Truth, Light, Life, Love, Real Happiness, Communion with God, Forgiveness, Miracles, Healing, Power, Eternity in Paradise, Contentment, and much more! (All "G" rated, so bring your family and friends.)

R.S.V.P. Very Important!
He must know ahead so He can reserve a spot for you at the table. Also, He's keeping a list of His friends for future reference. He calls it the "Lamb's Book of Life."

Party being given by His Kids (that's us!!)!

Hope to see you there! For those of you whom I will see at the party, share this with someone today!

Saturday, December 15, 2007

Ice Diving 2008


Omni Divers Ice Diving
January 2008 is now February 2008

DIVING LOCATIONS:
Lake of the Woods, Klamath Falls, OR
Looking forward to a great time!

DATES:
February 1 -3, 2008


COST:
Class - $295
Text - $35
Certification fees - $25

Omni Divers Ice Diving
March 2008

POTENTIAL DIVING LOCATIONS:
Cascade Lake, Cascade, ID
Payette Lake, McCall, ID

DATES:
March 14 - 16


PREREQUISITE:
Advanced Open Water Certification
or evidence of deep, navigation, and night dives

COST:
Class - $295
Text - $35
Certification fees - $25

Ice Diving Information for 2008

More Specific Detailed Information on February Ice Diving 2008!

Ice Diving February 2008: We have started the preparations for the February 2008's ice dives. We will stay in motel rooms in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

We will do a presentation in Klamath Falls on Friday evening at 6 pm at the new Omni Divers location.

We will get organized earlier than Friday night in order to see what everybody is going to bring as their share of shovels, tents, tarps, ropes, ice harnesses, cross cut saw, gas for the snow blower, the snow blower, blower oil, carabiners, dry clothing bags, several extra pairs of gloves, waterproof boots, dry socks, etc.

We need to provide special safety measures overnight so no one will fall in the hole, i.e. flagging, poles, etc.

More Specific Detailed Information on March Ice Diving 2008

Ice Diving March 2008: We have now established a date and will start in earnest for the preparations for the March 2008's ice dives. We will soon make room reservations McCall, Idaho for March 2008.

We will do a presentation in McCall on Friday evening at 6 pm at the new McCall Fire Station, McCall Idaho.

We still will need to get organized earlier than Friday night in order to see what everybody is going to bring as their share of shovels, tents, tarps, ropes, ice harnesses, cross cut saw, gas for the snow blower, the snow blower, blower oil, carabiners, dry clothing bags, several extra pairs of gloves, waterproof boots, dry socks, etc.

We will need to think of special safety measures overnight so no one falls in the hole, i.e. flagging, poles, etc.

About the only gear we don't have for ice diving is the tent, we can try to get the same tent we used last year from one of the ice divers or we can fabricate one from blue tarps and pvc pipe.

We have been getting interest statements and now we are getting deposits to verify how much really serious interest we have in ice diving in February and Klamath Falls in Oregon and in March 2008 in Idaho.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

Tuesday, December 04, 2007

Flying After Diving Studies at DAN Are Still in Flight


Alert Diver Article
Flying After Diving Studies at DAN Are Still in Flight
November / December 2007 Issue
By: Richard D. Vann, Ph.D., Neal W. Pollock, Ph.D., Petar J. Denoble, M.D., J. Jake Freiberger, M.D., M.

Flying at low barometric pressure after diving increases a diver's risk of decompression sickness (DCS) unless enough time is allowed at or near sea level for excess nitrogen to be washed out of the body. The time a diver should wait after a given dive to avoid unacceptable DCS risk has been a vexing question for 45 years.

The first reports of apparent DCS due to flying after diving appeared in 1961, when the pilot and copilot of a commercial aircraft reported symptoms.

They were flying at a cabin altitude of 8,000-10,000 feet (2,438-3,048 meters) and became incapacitated after diving not deeper than 30 feet of sea water (fsw)/9 meters of sea water (msw) less than four hours earlier. The flight engineer, who had been diving about 12 hours earlier, was less affected and landed the aircraft safely.

A 1967 U.S. Navy study using dogs found that 90 percent developed DCS after a one-hour surface interval but none after 12 hours. In 1972 the Navy recommended a 12-hour wait before flying after decompression dives and in 1985 specified a minimum two-hour delay after no-decompression dives.

The no-decompression recommendation was based on 39 human trials. The trials showed two DCS incidents in 39 exposures at 8,000 ft. (2,438 m) after a five-minute surface interval and nine incidents at 16,000 ft. (4,877 m) after surface intervals of five minutes to two hours.

In 1990 the U.S. Air Force required a 24-hour surface interval after any diving, and in 1991 Divers Alert Network(r) recommended at least 12 hours before flying and longer than 12 hours after repetitive multiday or decompression dives. Based on available data, none of these guidelines could be accepted with confidence.

PHASE I

To develop information that might assist in establishing more rational flying after diving guidelines, DAN(r) began human trials of flying after diving in 1992 at the Duke Hyperbaric Center. Two phases have been completed, and a third has begun.

The Exposures

The objective of Phase I was to find the preflight surface intervals that had low DCS risk after long no-decompression dives.1 The experimental subjects were seated at rest in a dry hyperbaric chamber during both dives and flights (Figure 1). The dive depths were 40, 60 and 100 fsw (12, 18 and 30 msw).

Researchers tested four single-dive profiles and five repetitive-dive profiles (Table 1). The surface interval between repetitive dives was one hour. The flight altitude was 8,000 feet (2,438 m), the maximum commercial airline cabin altitude allowed by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Table 1. Flying after diving dive profiles tested by DAN


The Results

In Phase I, 40 subjects out of 802 (5 percent) were classified as experiencing DCS as a result of flying. The minimum safe preflight surface interval for a dive was indicated by the surface interval at which the DCS incidence rose sharply as the duration of the surface interval was reduced. Single dives generally needed surface intervals of 11-12 hours for a low DCS risk, while repetitive dives needed up to 17 hours. A surface interval of 17 hours or more appeared to ensure a low DCS risk during subsequent flights for most no-decompression dives with dry, resting subjects.

The Discussion

The Phase I results were the basis of the guidelines for flying after recreational diving2 (see bottom, next page).

PHASE II

The U.S. Navy used the Phase I trials as the basis for flying after diving guidelines3 that were published in the 1999 U.S. Navy Diving Manual4 and the 2001 NOAA Diving Manual5. The Navy guidelines were much more flexible than the DAN guidelines, but many were untested, and the Navy asked DAN to validate several of these. This work was done as Phase II at the Duke Hyperbaric Center6.

The Exposures

Phase II tested a short no-decompression dive and a decompression dive, both to depths of 60 fsw (18 msw), to allow comparison with the earlier 60-fsw experiments (Table 1).

The no-decompression dive was for 40 minutes, and the decompression dive was for 120 minutes with a 26-minute stop at 10 fsw (3 msw). The Navy and NOAA dive manuals required a preflight surface interval of 12 hours, five minutes for the 40-minute dive and a 22-hour, 46-minute surface interval for the 120-minute dive. The same dry, resting conditions were used as in Phase I.

The Results

There were 12 DCS cases (2.1 percent) in 562 Phase II trials. For the single 55-minute dive in Phase I, the low DCS-risk surface interval had been 10-11 hours. For the 40-minute dive, the surface interval was progressively reduced to five minutes with no indication of increasing DCS incidence.

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Table 2: Phase I Flying After Diving Guidelines

The guidelines apply to air dives followed by flights at cabin altitudes of 2,000 to 8,000 feet (610 to 2,438 m) for divers who do not have DCS symptoms. The guidelines should reduce DCS risk during flying after diving but do not guarantee avoidance of DCS. Preflight surface intervals longer than the recommendations will reduce DCS risk further.

Guideline (a). Dives within the No-Decompression Limits

For a single no-decompression dive, a minimum preflight surface interval of 12 hours is suggested.

For multiple dives per day or multiple days of diving, a minimum preflight surface interval of 18 hours is suggested.

Guideline (b). Dives Requiring Decompression Stops

There is little experimental or published evidence on which to base a recommendation for decompression dives. A preflight surface interval substantially longer than 18 hours appears prudent.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Discussion

The bottom time at 60 fsw (18 msw) seemed to have a very strong influence on low-risk preflight surface intervals.

Repetitive diving and a decompression stop also appeared to strongly influence low-risk surface intervals. For the repetitive-dive profiles with 75 or 95 minutes total bottom times in Phase I, the low-risk surface interval was 15-16 hours. For the longer 120-minute decompression dive of Phase II, however, the DCS incidence remained low until a two-hour surface interval.

Two factors may have been responsible for the shorter low-risk surface intervals after the 120-minute dive. First, compared to single dives, the repetitive dives exposed subjects to multiple decompressions. These multiple ascents may have caused more bubble formation, which could reduce nitrogen elimination and thereby require longer surface intervals. Second, the 26-minute decompression stop at 10 fsw (3 msw) during the 120-minute dive may have avoided bubble formation and helped wash out dissolved nitrogen; this allowed shorter surface intervals.

The trials of the 120-minute decompression dive provide information that bears on Guideline (b) listed at left. Decompression dives may not necessarily require the long preflight surface intervals that Guideline (b) supposed. In fact, decompression stops or safety stops may be an effective means for reducing the DCS risk of flying after diving. This possibility warrants further investigation, as does oxygen breathing during preflight surface intervals.

PHASE III

The recommended flying after diving guidelines in the Navy and NOAA diving manuals were much longer than appeared necessary according to Phase II. For the 40-minute dive, direct ascent to 8,000 ft. (2,438 m) was possible with low DCS incidence, while the Navy guideline specified 12 hours, five minutes. For the 120-minute dive, a three-hour surface interval was achieved with low DCS incidence, while the Navy guideline specified 22 hours, 46 minutes.

Is this adequate information to justify shorter preflight guidelines for these dives and perhaps other dives as well? This might be true for dry, resting divers, but exercise, immersion and temperature can significantly affect nitrogen exchange and DCS risk.

The Phase III trials is testing divers who are immersed and exercising in warm water during a 55-minute dive to 60 fsw (18 msw). The results will be compared to the Phase I results for the same dive with dry, resting dives.

The reason that the Phases I and II divers were not tested with exercise and immersion was because only two wet divers can be exposed at the same time in the Duke chambers (Figure 2), while as many as 12 dry, resting divers can participate at once (Figure 1). We will need approximately two years to complete Phase III. The results will be combined with Phases I and II and used to calibrate a DCS probability model for recreational diving. The model will include both dive conditions and altitude exposure.

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References

1 Vann RD, Gerth WA, Denoble PJ, Pieper CF, Thalmann ED. "Experimental trials to assess the risks of decompression sickness in flying after diving." Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine 2004; 31(3):431-444.

2 Sheffield PJ, Vann RD, eds. Flying After Recreational Diving. Durham, N.C.: Divers Alert Network, 2004.

3 Flynn E. "1999 U.S. Navy procedures for ascent to altitude after diving." In: Sheffield PJ, Vann RD, editors. Flying After Recreational Diving; Durham, N.C.: Divers Alert Network, 2004: 20-31.

4 "Ascent to altitude after diving/flying after diving." Arlington, Va.: U.S. Department of the Navy; 1999 April 1982. Report No.: SS521-Ag-PRO-010 / 0910-LP-708-8000, Revision 4.

5 NOAA Diving Manual: Diving for science and technology. 4 ed. Silver Spring, Md.: U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2001.

6 Vann RD, Pollock NW, Freiberger JJ, Natoli MJ, Denoble PJ, Pieper CF. "Influence of bottom time on preflight surface intervals before flying after diving." Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine 2007; 34(3):211-220.

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(c) DAN - Alert Diver November / December 2007

Tuesday, November 06, 2007

DAN Training and Education, Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries


DAN Training and Education

Classes starting November 18, 2007, Grants Pass Oregon. Email for details.

As a DAN Instructor, you can offer your students nine classes that will help make them safer divers.

These classes are:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
a
Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies

Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries

Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving

Automated External Defibrillators for Aquatic Emergencies

Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals

Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen (REMO2™)

On-Site Neurological Assessment for Divers

Diving First Aid for Professional Divers

Diving Emergency Management Provider Program


DAN Instructors are scuba diving educators who want to offer dive safety programs to their students. To become a DAN Instructor, you must participate in a DAN Instructor Qualification Course (IQC).

The IQC follows a modular format. There is a Core Module and then a separate module representing each training program. You can take all nine modules as part of one course, or just take the Core Module and one course module - whatever you are interested in teaching. Later, as long as you remain a current and active DAN Instructor, you can take additional modules without retaking the Core Module. The Core Module is now available online.

Prerequisites for DAN Instructor Qualification Course:

DAN Member
Active scuba diving educator*
Current CPR Instructor
Documentation of First Aid training

Prerequisites for DAN IQC Modules:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

CPR Instructor

Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies

CPR Instructor

Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Instructor

First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries

CPR Instructor

Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving

CPR Instructor

Automated External Defibrillators for Aquatic Emergencies

Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving Instructor

Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals

CPR Training

Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen (REMO2™)

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Instructor

On-Site Neurological Assessment for Divers

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Instructor

Dive Accident First Aid for Non-Divers

To offer this program, DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors must be in Active Teaching Status for:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries
Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving

Diving First Aid for Professional Divers

To qualify, the candidate must:

Have an affiliation with an aquarium, scientific diving program, public safety diving program or a commercial diving operation
Be a CPR Instructor
Be a current DAN Member

Current DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors who are certified to teach Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries, AEDs for Scuba Diving and First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries, and who meet the other criteria, may complete an online crossover to be certified in this program as well.

Diving Emergency Management Provider

To offer this program, DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors must be in Active Teaching Status for:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries
Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving

Preferred Additional Credentials:
Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Take the Core Module Online

* Note about the scuba diving educator requirement: Any scuba diving instructor or assistant instructor with a recognized scuba training organization can attend the IQC. A divemaster/divecon who is also a CPR and First Aid instructor with a recognized training agency can also attend the IQC.

Course Objective

The DAN Instructor Qualification Course (IQC) trains and educates qualified scuba diving educators to plan, manage, conduct and promote dive safety through DAN Training Programs such as the Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries course, the Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen (REMO2™) course, the Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving and the First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries course along with the Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies course.

In addition, the course develops role-model teaching techniques in the use of first aid for suspected dive injuries. Instructor Candidates also have the opportunity to develop further knowledge in relation to the special considerations involved in providing emergency first aid.

The DAN IQC consists of eight modules. There is a core module that introduces DAN and the DAN Training philosophy. This core program serves as the introduction for all other DAN Training programs. The remaining program modules represent each of the individual training courses offered by DAN. Qualified Instructor Trainers can present all seven program modules or select only the modules appropriate for the Instructor Candidates.

Qualifications of DAN Instructors

Successful completion of the DAN Instructor Qualification Course (IQC) results in certification recognizing the Instructor Candidate's understanding and performance of the knowledge and skills contained within this program.

Instructors must maintain active teaching status with DAN in order to conduct DAN Training programs. In order to maintain active teaching status, DAN Instructors must teach or assist with teaching each course they are certified in once within a 24-month period.

Recommended Minimum Hours of Training

Knowledge and Skills Development

Core Module: 4 Hours
Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Module: 2-3 Hours
Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies Module: 2-3 Hours
Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries: 1-2 Hours
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries Module: 2-3 Hours
Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving: 1-2 Hours
Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals: 8 Hours
Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen Module: 1-2 Hours

The time the course actually takes to teach varies depending upon many factors, including the number of students and their ability to process the educational components of the program along with the number of modules offered. Instructor Trainers desiring to include subjects or training beyond the course requirements may do so only before or following the course. Any additional training must not be required for completion of course requirements.

Required Curriculum Subject Areas

The Instructor Trainer must ensure Instructor Candidate familiarity with each of the following subject areas:

Knowledge Development

Core Module


What is DAN?
DAN Training Methodology
Role of the DAN Instructor
General Standards and Procedures for All DAN Training Programs
Marketing DAN Training Programs
Disease Transmission
Oxygen and AED Equipment/Safety
First Aid Equipment

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Course Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies Course Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development
O2 Resuscitation Systems (MTV and BVM)
Providing Advanced Oxygen First Aid
Recommendations for Advanced Oxygen Providers and equipment use
Skills Development
CPR Review
Resuscitation with an MTV
Resuscitation with a BVM

First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals

Knowledge and Skills Development categories
Initial Assessment
Airway management
Breathing and ventilation
Circulation
Including AED use
Control of bleeding
Shock management
Ongoing Assessment

REMO2™ Course Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Diving Emergency Management Provider

To offer this program, DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors must be in Active Teaching Status for:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries
Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving

Preferred Additional Credentials:
DAN Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Examination

General Standards and Procedures Exam - 20 Questions
Module Exams - 10 Questions Each

Course Summary

The Instructor Trainer must ensure that the Instructor Candidate is able to successfully demonstrate the ability to perform the required skills for each certified program in a role model fashion.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

PSI/PCI Visual Inspection Training

=
November 6, 2007

Worldwide Training in High Pressure Cylinder Safety

Greetings,

Thank you for your interest in the upcoming PSI Visual Cylinder Inspector training.

The next course in your area will be held Saturday, November 17, 2007 in Grants Pass, Pregon starting at 9:00 am.

This certification course teaches the basics of conducting the annual visual inspections of solid wall and composite SCUBA and SCBA cylinders. The 7 - 8 hour course is suited for those new to visual inspection well as those who have been inspecting without formal training through its wide range of inspection subjects including damage limits, neck cracking, and laws affecting inspectors. In addition, this course meets the OSHA and DOT requirements for employee HAZMAT training and attendants completing the course are qualified to conduct "in-house" HAZMAT training for cylinder handlers. Previously certified inspectors may attend this full course or the Refresher Course for re-qualification. The course is open to anyone 16 years or older and no previous cylinder inspection experience is required. Participates receive certification as Visual Cylinder Inspectors upon course completion.

The course tuition is $350.00 and includes the text book "Inspecting Cylinders" by Bill High, a course curriculum workbook; supplemental materials and certification are also included in the course tuition.

If you have any other questions before the class is scheduled feel free to contact me directly.

Thanks again for you interest in our training program.

Regards,

Phil Graf
PSI Instructor # 130
omnidive@omnidivers.com

For more information about Visual Cylinder Training, both SCBA and SCUBA, contact omnidive@omnidivers.com.

Link at
www.omnidivers.com/visualcylinderinspection.html
.

Link at
www.omnidivers.com/visualcylinderinspectionclasses.html


Thank you for your interest in the upcoming PSI Visual Cylinder Inspector training.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

Monday, October 08, 2007

TDI Blender Course - October 13, 2007 - Klamath Falls OR



There is to be a TDI Blender Course at the home of the Klamath County Sheriff's Dive Rescue team on October 13, 2007, in Klamath Falls OR.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

SAR Conference - September 11 - 13, 2008 - Portland Oregon

Rob W wrote:

Hey folks-

I am working on the "water" portion of a SAR conference in Oregon for 2008. I need to ask you fine folks for some help with 2 things. Did anyone attend the Hybrid car presentation at IADRS, and what is your feedback?

Secondly, I want to get an MD or like to come talk about general dive fitness, and medical complications with divers up to and including DCS, recognition and prehospital care. DAN has not returned my emails...yet. I contacted Virgina Mason hospital in Washington but one there can commit. The local doc's at the Portland chamber aren't interested. Anyone have any leads/contacts?

Thanks,
Rob

We are planning a 3 SAR day conference Sep 11-13 in Portland. I have been tasked with the "water" portion. I hope you can make it. It will have several "tracks" so at any given hour you have a few options to choose from.

It has been a challenge to create this track and keep the appeal for all that work around water. I want to appeal to SAR coordinators, divers, SRTS, EMT's, and boat handlers.

Here is a tentative line up for the water track. I have the ME doing his thing you saw at the dive conference, a guy coming to talk about hybrid cars in water, a guy on diver health (DCS etc), a white water expert with case reviews (risk/benefit) , Redman trainer coming in to do full day of in water exercises dealing with panic/hostile victims in water, waterborne ICS management class, and managing risk in waterborne training (Damen Rusk)

What are your thought/ input? I hope the Marine Board steps up and sends some folks.
Rob

doug strain wr

Hey Rob, get a hold of Klamath County. There dive captain is a DAN trainer and works in the medical field.

Doug Strain

Wednesday, October 03, 2007

YMCA Scuba Instructor Institute

YMCA Scuba Instructor Institute
YMCA Scuba Diving Instructor Crossover Institute

Course Details and Costs as of 10/01/07

Costs:

Books and Materials: $300 which includes shipping to your address from three different sources. This fee is due upon sign up. It can be made by check or deposited into a US Bank account in your area. If this option is used, an account number will be made available.

YMCA Instructor Trainer (IT) Fees: Deposited prior to first class. Email omnidive@omnidivers.com for current fees.

YMCA Scuba Agency Fees: $225 payable to YMCA at successful completion of the course.

You provide:

Pool: Suitable YMCA or equivalent pool (6-foot minimum depth, fees, etc. (for both student and IT)) for pool sessions on both days (2 – 3 hour minimum each day). Times need not be the same.

Equipment: Standard Leadership Diving Equipment for pool only use. List is provided in the Materials listed above. (We will not be going to the open water unless the IT deems it necessary, and this will be an extra expense and time for the IT and student(s)).

Cylinders: One for the IT and one for you filled with at least 2250 psi of air.

Time: Expect that we would meet around 8 am the first day and go until 5 pm the first day depending on the number of candidates and just how active the discussion is and then at 9 am and go until 4 pm the second day, if all goes well and the candidates produce acceptable results.

Be expected to Complete:
Swim Test: Be prepared to take the swim test as outlined in the materials on the first day of the class.

Take Home Exam: Complete the exam prior to class, provided in the materials, and we will discuss during class.

Paper Work Requirements:

Provide the YMCA Instructor Trainer with copies of the following:
Your $1,000,000 (minimum) scuba diving instructional liability insurance
(prior to certification by YMCA, a binder will need to be provided to the YMCA showing the YMCA as an additional insured)
current medical history form completed by a physician
instructor ratings and specialty ratings (cards)
current CPR card
current First Aid card
current oxygen administration certification.

Prerequisites:

Please check http://www.ymcascuba.org/ymcascub/aninst.html for a list of all of them.

Thank you for your interest in the YSCUBA program.

Phillip E. Graf
YMCA Scuba Diving Instructor Trainer
www.omnidivers.com
omnidive@omnidivers.com

2007 YMCA SCUBA Instructor Institute

The 2007 YMCA SCUBA Instructor Institute will be completed on the weekend of October 12 through 14, 2007 in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

For more information on what the existing candidates for the institute have completed, please read on.

Instructor

In 1959, the YMCA developed SCUBA training standards for instructors. These standards remain the most thorough and comprehensive in the diving industry today.

When it comes to SCUBA certification, trust is an important aspect of training. YMCA SCUBA Instructors follow the philosophy of the YMCA while building self-esteem and nurturing personal growth in divers. YMCA leadership prides itself with maintaining values. In a sport such as SCUBA diving, it is important for those participating to have values, good moral character and ethics. YMCA SCUBA Instructors instill character development in their students by promoting caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility during dive training.

Instructor certification permits an individual to teach SCUBA students how to become competent divers. The Instructor promotes safe diving and upholds the standards of YMCA SCUBA. The Instructor also teaches many specialty and leadership courses.

Phase Training Overview

YMCA SCUBA has a three phase training sequence that leads to SCUBA Instructor. Each of these leadership institutes follows the same outline regardless of where it is offered. Candidates may then attend institute phases at different locations.

Instructor crossovers from another agency are usually combined with Phase III institutes as the prerequisites and requirements are very similar.

Instructors interested in crossover requirements should review the description of Phase III in this blog, and then email omnidive@omnidivers.com for more information.

Phase I Advanced Training for Leadership

This phase provides you with information on advanced diving, YMCA SCUBA and the additional requirements and preparation required for farther leadership training. A pool session reviews basic skills and previews the pool teaching requirements for the other phases.

Prerequisites:YMCA SCUBA has a three phase training sequence that leads to SCUBA Instructor. Each of these leadership institutes follows the same outline regardless of where it is offered. Candidates may then attend institute phases at different locations.

Instructor crossovers from another agency are usually combined with Phase III institutes as the prerequisites and requirements are very similar.

Instructors interested in crossover requirements should review the description of Phase III in this blog, and then email omnidive@omnidivers.com for more information.

Prerequisites:
* 17 years of age or older
* 15 logged dives
* medical questionnaire
* statement of understanding/waiver release

Phase II Assistant Instructor Institute

Institute staff present lectures on teaching techniques and various subjects of the entry-level course. Your diving knowledge is tested with a written exam, and your presentation technique is evaluated when you give a short talk typical of an entry-level course. An open water session evaluates your ability to rescue a diver and conduct a tour dive as you may be called upon to do during a checkout dive. This phase prepares you to take a more active role in the training of SCUBA students while working with a SCUBA Instructor. You may also gain experience by teaching the YMCA Safe Snorkeling and Skin Diving courses.

Prerequisites:
* Phase I completion
* 18 years of age or older
* attend/observe at least an Open Water diver course
* medical exam
* current CPR and First Aid
* Oxygen Administration
* Dive Activities Management specialty course
* S.L.A.M. course (or S.L.A.M. crossover if Rescue Diver from another agency)
* current YMCA SCUBA Standards & Procedures Manual

Phase III SCUBA Instructor Institute
What you have learned during Phase I and II, the teaching experience you have gained as an Assistant Instructor and your additional study and preparation are evaluated during this phase. You must take several written exams, be evaluated on your classroom and pool teaching techniques, demonstrate proficiency in pool and open water skills and conduct a mock open water checkout dive with the staff playing the role of your students. Additional staff lectures cover the administrative aspects of being a YMCA SCUBA Instructor.

Prerequisites:
* completion of Phase I and II or current instructor with a nationally-recognized SCUBA certification agency
* 18 years of age or older
* current medical exam
* current CPR and First Aid
* current Oxygen Administration
* at least one year of diving experience since entry-level certification
* documented 100 logged SCUBA dives
* documented 15 hours of lecture experience
* documented proof of assisting with at least three separate open water class checkouts
* a complete classroom and pool teaching outline for entry-level SCUBA class you plan to teach
* S.L.A.M. Rescue Diver (or S.L.A.M. crossover if Rescue Diver from another agency)
* current YMCA SCUBA Standards and Procedures Manual

We would like candidates for Phase I, II, or III to contact omnidive@omnidivers.com and then they can get a copy of the Leadership Prep Manual that contains additional information on prerequisites and completion requirements.

For more information about leadership training, contact omnidive@omnidivers.com.

Link at www.ymcascuba.org/ymcascub/aninst.html

IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix course


Beginning on September 28 and going through September 30, 2007, the IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix course is being offered.

Below is listed some of the particulars for the course.

Advanced Recreational Trimix Diver

A. Purpose

1. This Program is designed to extend the diver’s knowledge in the use of EANx for Sport diving. It further develops diving skills and provides a greater understanding of the EANx concept of diving. It is also intended to supplement the skills of recreational trimix divers.

2. The Program employs EANx mixes from 21% to a maximum of 50% oxygen. For divers qualified as recreational Trimix Divers mixtures of a minimum of 28 % oxygen combined with a Helium content that maintains an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw) may be used.

3. This program qualifies divers to perform Trimix Dives outside of training up to 150 fsw (45 msw) and perform decompression stops required dives up to 15 minutes using EAN 50 as a decompression gas.

B. Prerequisites

1. Must be qualified as an IANTD Recreational Trimix Diver with proof of a minimum of 30 logged dives or sufficient experience to satisfy the instructor that the student has the ability and knowledge to continue into this level of training.

2. Must be a minimum of 15 years of age with a parent or guardian authorization, or a minimum of 18 years of age without guardian approval.

C. Texts

1. IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Student Manual and Workbook, or equivalent text(s) approved in writing by the Board of Directors (written approval will be issued by IAND, Inc./IANTD World Headquarters).

D. Program Content

1. All Lecture and theory material must be completed.

2. This Program must include a minimum of 120 minutes of OW bottom time completed within 4 dives, 2 of which must be to depths between 100 fsw (30 msw) and 150 fsw (45 msw). If combined with a Deep Diver Program, the total dive time for both Programs must include a minimum of 160 minutes completed within 6 or more dives. Even if the time and skill requirements are met within fewer than 6 dives, the minimum 6 dives must be made. If combined with a Deep Diver Program 3 dives must be made to depths between 100 fsw (30 msw) and 150 fsw (45 msw). All dives deeper than 80 fsw (24 msw) must be made on recreational trimix mixtures.

3. Students are taught the use of Recreational trimix mixtures from 25% to a maximum of 40% oxygen and with a helium content with an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw) for diving. EANx mixtures in the range of 41% to a maximum of 50% oxygen are used to for safety and decompression stops.

E. Equipment Requirements

1. A safety or decompression gas cylinder (if used) rigged as either a pony or stage cylinder. Gas cylinders must be oxygen clean and oxygen serviceable where needed.

F. Program Limits

1. There may be no more than 4 students per Instructor. This ratio may be increased by 2 students for each assisting IANTD Divemaster, up to a maximum of 8 students with 2 IANTD Divemasters per class session.

2. No dives may be conducted to depths greater than 150 fsw (45 msw).

3. All dives must be conducted using EANx (maximum 40% oxygen). A higher EANx (maximum 50% oxygen) may be used at the decompression or safety stops.

4. All appropriate safety or required decompression stops must be performed.

5. Mandatory decompression stops are limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.

6. No dives made me made with a PO2 greater than 1.6.

G. Water Skills Development

1. A confined water session must be completed before conducting any OW dives.

2. Demonstrate proficiency in a variety of dive techniques and employ precision buoyancy control.

a. Swim in a simulated out-of-air situation (without breathing, and exhaling slowly) without a mask for a distance of at least 45 feet (15 meters), and commence gas sharing; or appropriate Rebreather gas management drill for out-of air diver. While gas sharing, swim for 3 minutes, then replace and clear mask.

Revision Date August 15, 2003
Copyright 2003 by IAND, Inc. / IANTD All Rights Reserved "The Leader in Diving Education"

Confined Water: yes
Number of Dives: 4 dives
Bottom Time: 120 minutes
Depth Limit: 150 feet
Dives to Specific Depths: 2 dives between 100 and 150 feet

IANTD Text: IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Student Manual and Workbook

Text Costs: $35

Certification Fees: $25

Instructor Fees: $495

Gear rental, additional required student manuals, required tables and charts, boat fees, entry fees to dive sites, travel fees, gas fills, etc. are extra and are not included in the listed fees.

Link at www.omnidivers.com/iantdrecreationaltrimixclass.html

Monday, September 17, 2007

ERD I (Emergency Response Diving International) Tender - Entry Level Course



This entry level Emergency Response Diving International tender course is designed to give the public safety surface support personnel the fundamental skills needed to safely function as part of a public safety dive team and is OSHA and NFPA compliant. Topics such as problem solving, tender skills, search patterns, and evidence handling are covered just to name a few. Tender skills include executing search patterns, victim recovery, emergency procedures, and decontamination procedures among others. ERD Tender and ERD I also serves as a prerequisite to ERD Ops Components courses.

Class to be offered September 15 and 16, 2007, McCall Idaho.



Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

Open and Advanced Water and Rescue Class - September 13 - 16, 2007



McCall Fire/Dive Rescue


is hosting the following courses at their facility in McCall, Idaho.

Open Water Class starting September 13 and ending September 16, 2007

Advanced Open Water Class starting September 15 and ending September 16, 2007.

Rescue Class starting September 16 and ending September 17, 2007.

You are invited to join team members in the classes.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information on costs and specific times associated with the listed dates.

Tuesday, September 04, 2007

Who is ERDi?

ERDI is the Public Safety diving (PSD) agency that trains Police, Fire and other public safety organizations in Search and Rescue techniques in just about every submerged environment known. ERDI trains departments on how to make and maintain their own PSD teams along with being the only Public Safety diving training agency that has their own insurance that endorses its own standards. All the programs are OSHA and NFPA compliant. Some of the most successful ERDI teams are the Chicago Fire Department, Chicago Police Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

Helping Public Safety Professionals, into ----and out, of the water!

Sunday, September 02, 2007

IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Class - Crescent Lake, Oregon on September 28 - 30, 2007


Beginning on September 28 and going through September 30, 2007, the IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix course is being offered.

Below is listed some of the particulars for the course.

Advanced Recreational Trimix Diver

A. Purpose

1. This Program is designed to extend the diver’s knowledge in the use of EANx for Sport diving. It further develops diving skills and provides a greater understanding of the EANx concept of diving. It is also intended to supplement the skills of recreational trimix divers.

2. The Program employs EANx mixes from 21% to a maximum of 50% oxygen. For divers qualified as recreational Trimix Divers mixtures of a minimum of 28 % oxygen combined with a Helium content that maintains an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw) may be used.

3. This program qualifies divers to perform Trimix Dives outside of training up to 150 fsw (45 msw) and perform decompression stops required dives up to 15 minutes using EAN 50 as a decompression gas.

B. Prerequisites

1. Must be qualified as an IANTD Recreational Trimix Diver with proof of a minimum of 30 logged dives or sufficient experience to satisfy the instructor that the student has the ability and knowledge to continue into this level of training.

2. Must be a minimum of 15 years of age with a parent or guardian authorization, or a minimum of 18 years of age without guardian approval.

C. Texts

1. IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Student Manual and Workbook, or equivalent text(s) approved in writing by the Board of Directors (written approval will be issued by IAND, Inc./IANTD World Headquarters).

D. Program Content

1. All Lecture and theory material must be completed.

2. This Program must include a minimum of 120 minutes of OW bottom time completed within 4 dives, 2 of which must be to depths between 100 fsw (30 msw) and 150 fsw (45 msw). If combined with a Deep Diver Program, the total dive time for both Programs must include a minimum of 160 minutes completed within 6 or more dives. Even if the time and skill requirements are met within fewer than 6 dives, the minimum 6 dives must be made. If combined with a Deep Diver Program 3 dives must be made to depths between 100 fsw (30 msw) and 150 fsw (45 msw). All dives deeper than 80 fsw (24 msw) must be made on recreational trimix mixtures.

3. Students are taught the use of Recreational trimix mixtures from 25% to a maximum of 40% oxygen and with a helium content with an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw) for diving. EANx mixtures in the range of 41% to a maximum of 50% oxygen are used to for safety and decompression stops.

E. Equipment Requirements

1. A safety or decompression gas cylinder (if used) rigged as either a pony or stage cylinder. Gas cylinders must be oxygen clean and oxygen serviceable where needed.

F. Program Limits

1. There may be no more than 4 students per Instructor. This ratio may be increased by 2 students for each assisting IANTD Divemaster, up to a maximum of 8 students with 2 IANTD Divemasters per class session.

2. No dives may be conducted to depths greater than 150 fsw (45 msw).

3. All dives must be conducted using EANx (maximum 40% oxygen). A higher EANx (maximum 50% oxygen) may be used at the decompression or safety stops.

4. All appropriate safety or required decompression stops must be performed.

5. Mandatory decompression stops are limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.

6. No dives made me made with a PO2 greater than 1.6.

G. Water Skills Development

1. A confined water session must be completed before conducting any OW dives.

2. Demonstrate proficiency in a variety of dive techniques and employ precision buoyancy control.

a. Swim in a simulated out-of-air situation (without breathing, and exhaling slowly) without a mask for a distance of at least 45 feet (15 meters), and commence gas sharing; or appropriate Rebreather gas management drill for out-of air diver. While gas sharing, swim for 3 minutes, then replace and clear mask.

Revision Date August 15, 2003
Copyright 2003 by IAND, Inc. / IANTD All Rights Reserved "The Leader in Diving Education"

Confined Water: yes
Number of Dives: 4 dives
Bottom Time: 120 minutes
Depth Limit: 150 feet
Dives to Specific Depths: 2 dives between 100 and 150 feet

IANTD Text: IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Student Manual and Workbook

Text Costs: $35

Certification Fees: $25

Instructor Fees: $495

Gear rental, additional required student manuals, required tables and charts, boat fees, entry fees to dive sites, travel fees, gas fills, etc. are extra and are not included in the listed fees.

Link at www.omnidivers.com/iantdrecreationaltrimixclass.html

International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers (IANTD) Recreational Trimix Class - Crescent Lake, OR - Sept 28 - 30, 2007


An International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers (IANTD) Recreational Trimix Class is to be completed in Crescent Lake, Oregon on September 28 - 30, 2007.

This Program is designed to provide Sport Divers with a breathing medium for extending their dives to Sport Diving Depths by using ENDs in the 40 to 80 fsw (12 to 24 msw) depth ranges. The diver may elect to dive the "mix" on tables or computers.

The IANTD Recreational Trimix Diver qualification may be taught as a single program or combined with a variety of the IANTD Advanced or Specialty Diver Programs.

The Program covers the use of Recreational (Rec) diving mixes in the range of 28 to 40% oxygen with Helium content to provide an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw).

The program qualifies divers to do no stop required dives using Recreational Trimix Gas mixtures to a depth of 100 fsw (30 msw) or deeper up to students previous qualification level.

Prerequisites: Must be a qualified Advanced Open Water diver or equivalent and EANx Diver or take the EANx Diver course in conjunction with the Recreational Trimix Diver course.

Link at www.omnidivers.com/iantdtrimixclass.html

Friday, August 17, 2007

TDI - Advanced Nitrox Course - Crescent Lake, Oregon



This course examines the use of EAN-21 through one hundred (100) percent oxygen for optimal mixes to a depth of forty (40) msw/One hundered thirty (130) fsw. The objective of this course is to train divers in the benefits, hazards and proper procedures for utilizing EAN-21 trhough one hundred (100) percent oxygen for dives not requiring staged decommpression.

Thursday, August 16, 2007

IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Class - Crescent Lake, Oregon on August 24 - 26, 2007


Beginning on August 24 and going through August 26, 2007, the IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix course is being offered.

Below is listed some of the particulars for the course.

Advanced Recreational Trimix Diver

A. Purpose

1. This Program is designed to extend the diver’s knowledge in the use of EANx for Sport diving. It further develops diving skills and provides a greater understanding of the EANx concept of diving. It is also intended to supplement the skills of recreational trimix divers.

2. The Program employs EANx mixes from 21% to a maximum of 50% oxygen. For divers qualified as recreational Trimix Divers mixtures of a minimum of 28 % oxygen combined with a Helium content that maintains an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw) may be used.

3. This program qualifies divers to perform Trimix Dives outside of training up to 150 fsw (45 msw) and perform decompression stops required dives up to 15 minutes using EAN 50 as a decompression gas.

B. Prerequisites

1. Must be qualified as an IANTD Recreational Trimix Diver with proof of a minimum of 30 logged dives or sufficient experience to satisfy the instructor that the student has the ability and knowledge to continue into this level of training.

2. Must be a minimum of 15 years of age with a parent or guardian authorization, or a minimum of 18 years of age without guardian approval.

C. Texts

1. IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Student Manual and Workbook, or equivalent text(s) approved in writing by the Board of Directors (written approval will be issued by IAND, Inc./IANTD World Headquarters).

D. Program Content

1. All Lecture and theory material must be completed.

2. This Program must include a minimum of 120 minutes of OW bottom time completed within 4 dives, 2 of which must be to depths between 100 fsw (30 msw) and 150 fsw (45 msw). If combined with a Deep Diver Program, the total dive time for both Programs must include a minimum of 160 minutes completed within 6 or more dives. Even if the time and skill requirements are met within fewer than 6 dives, the minimum 6 dives must be made. If combined with a Deep Diver Program 3 dives must be made to depths between 100 fsw (30 msw) and 150 fsw (45 msw). All dives deeper than 80 fsw (24 msw) must be made on recreational trimix mixtures.

3. Students are taught the use of Recreational trimix mixtures from 25% to a maximum of 40% oxygen and with a helium content with an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw) for diving. EANx mixtures in the range of 41% to a maximum of 50% oxygen are used to for safety and decompression stops.

E. Equipment Requirements

1. A safety or decompression gas cylinder (if used) rigged as either a pony or stage cylinder. Gas cylinders must be oxygen clean and oxygen serviceable where needed.

F. Program Limits

1. There may be no more than 4 students per Instructor. This ratio may be increased by 2 students for each assisting IANTD Divemaster, up to a maximum of 8 students with 2 IANTD Divemasters per class session.

2. No dives may be conducted to depths greater than 150 fsw (45 msw).

3. All dives must be conducted using EANx (maximum 40% oxygen). A higher EANx (maximum 50% oxygen) may be used at the decompression or safety stops.

4. All appropriate safety or required decompression stops must be performed.

5. Mandatory decompression stops are limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.

6. No dives made me made with a PO2 greater than 1.6.

G. Water Skills Development

1. A confined water session must be completed before conducting any OW dives.

2. Demonstrate proficiency in a variety of dive techniques and employ precision buoyancy control.

a. Swim in a simulated out-of-air situation (without breathing, and exhaling slowly) without a mask for a distance of at least 45 feet (15 meters), and commence gas sharing; or appropriate Rebreather gas management drill for out-of air diver. While gas sharing, swim for 3 minutes, then replace and clear mask.

Revision Date August 15, 2003
Copyright 2003 by IAND, Inc. / IANTD All Rights Reserved "The Leader in Diving Education"

Confined Water: yes
Number of Dives: 4 dives
Bottom Time: 120 minutes
Depth Limit: 150 feet
Dives to Specific Depths: 2 dives between 100 and 150 feet

IANTD Text: IANTD Advanced Recreational Trimix Student Manual and Workbook

Text Costs: $35

Certification Fees: $25

Instructor Fees: $495

Gear rental, additional required student manuals, required tables and charts, boat fees, entry fees to dive sites, travel fees, gas fills, etc. are extra and are not included in the listed fees.

Link at www.omnidivers.com/iantdrecreationaltrimixclass.html

IANTD Recreational Trimix Class - Crescent Lake, Oregon on August 24 - 26, 2007


An International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers (IANTD) Recreational Trimix Class is to be completed in Crescent Lake, Oregon on August 24 - 26, 2007.

This Program is designed to provide Sport Divers with a breathing medium for extending their dives to Sport Diving Depths by using ENDs in the 40 to 80 fsw (12 to 24 msw) depth ranges. The diver may elect to dive the "mix" on tables or computers.

The IANTD Recreational Trimix Diver qualification may be taught as a single program or combined with a variety of the IANTD Advanced or Specialty Diver Programs.

The Program covers the use of Recreational (Rec) diving mixes in the range of 28 to 40% oxygen with Helium content to provide an END no greater than 80 fsw (24 msw).

The program qualifies divers to do no stop required dives using Recreational Trimix Gas mixtures to a depth of 100 fsw (30 msw) or deeper up to students previous qualification level.

Prerequisites: Must be a qualified Advanced Open Water diver or equivalent and EANx Diver or take the EANx Diver course in conjunction with the Recreational Trimix Diver course.

Link at www.omnidivers.com/iantdtrimixclass.html

TDI – Semi-Closed Circuit Rebreather Instructor and Diver Course - Drager Dolphin



TDI – Semi-Closed Circuit Rebreather Instructor and Diver Course, Unit Specific- DOLPHIN

Drager Dolphin Semi-Closed Rebreather course required dives to be held at Crescent Lake, Oregon on August 25 and 26, 2007.

Introduction

This is the entry-level certification course for recreational divers wishing to utilize one of the following Semi-closed circuit Rebreathers; Dolphin. The objective of this course is to train recreational divers in the benefits, hazards, and proper procedures for using SCR Rebreathers.

Required Equipment

The following equipment is required for each student:

1. Drager Dolphin Rebreather.
2. Integrated PO2 monitoring device for inhaled PO2.
3. Mask and fins.
4. Exposure suit appropriate for the open water environment.
5. Access to oxygen analyzer.
6. Appropriate weight.
7. Bailout cylinder (minimum size 3L / twelve (12) cu. ft.)
8. Flow meter.

The Rebreather Manual and the manufactures’ manual are mandatory for use during this course.

The following topics must be covered during this course:

1. History and Evolution of Rebreathers.
2. Comparison of Open Circuit, Closed Circuit, and Semi-closed Circuit.
3. Practical Mechanics of the System

A. Assembly and disassembly of the Rebreather.
B. Layout and design.
C. Scrubber recharge.
D. System maintenance.
E. Breathing loop decontamination procedures.
4. Review of nitrox
A. Dalton’s Law (triangle)
B. Optimum nitrox mix
C. Oxygen Tracking
D. Gas preparation
E. Dive planning examples
5. Gas physiology
A. Oxygen toxicity.
B. Hyperoxia.
C. Hypoxia.
D. Asphyxia
E. Hypercapnia
F. Nitrogen absorption.
G. CO2 toxicity.
H. Gas consumption.
i. Cylinder sizes
ii. Depth and workload
6. Formula work / metabolic consumption
A. 02 metabolizing calculations.
B. Inspired 02 calculations (Rebreather Equation).
C. Equivalent air depth.
7. Dive Tables
A. Inspired 02 table.
B. Equivalent air depth.
8. Dive Computers
A. Mix adjustable.
B. 02 integrated.
C. P02 monitoring devices
9. Problem Solving
A. Canister flooding
B. Mouthpiece loss
C. Scrubber exhaustion
D. Battery or sensor loss
E. Breathing Bag rupture
F. Open circuit bailout system
i. On board gas
ii. Off board gas
G. Hyperoxia scenario
H. Hypoxia scenario
I. hypercapnia scenario
J. Post problem maintenance of equipment
10. Dive Planning
A. Operational Planning
i. Gas requirements.
ii. Oxygen limitations.
iii. Nitrogen limitations.

Required Skill Performance and Graduation Requirements:

The dive depth shall not exceed one point six (1.6 ATM) P02.

The following skills must be completed by the student during open water dives:

1. Properly analyze gas mixture.
2. Perform all pre dive checks (positive, negative, flow rate, by-pass regulator operation, relief valve pressure) a minimum of six (6) times.
3. Demonstrate a leak check and repair scenario.
4. Not required for the Dolphin.
5. Properly packing a scrubber canister a minimum of two (2) times (if using the ExtendAir cartridge one packing must be with granular material).
6. Properly execute set-up and breakdown a minimum of four (4) times for Draeger rebreathers.
7. Demonstrate adequate pre-dive planning.
A. Limits based on system performance.
B. Limits based upon oxygen exposures at planned depth with mix.
C. Limits based upon nitrogen absorption at planned depth with mix.
8. Properly execute the planned dives within all pre-determined limits.
9. Properly execute a recovery from a system failure and switch to bail-out stationary a minimum of two (2) times.
10. Properly execute a recovery from a system failure and switch to bail-out hovering a minimum of two (2) times, one of the bail-out scenarios the diver must switch to open circuit and complete dive and safety stop on open circuit (direct ascent must begin when diver switches to open circuit, this scenario should be conducted no deeper than 60 fsw / 20 meters).
11. Properly demonstrate hose clearing technique after each bail-out scenario.
12. Not required on a Dolphin.
13. Proper PO2 monitoring on all dives (if unit is equipped with P02 monitoring device).
14. Properly execute a mask clearing exercise with emphasis on minimal gas loss.
15. Safely and properly execute a buddy out of air scenario, it is preferable the buddy is on a SCR unit also.
16. Diver will demonstrate actual safety stops at pre-determined depths.
17. Properly execute cleaning and maintenance of the Rebreather, including breathing loop decontamination.

Course Structure and Duration

Open Water Execution:


A minimum of four (4) dives with a minimum of one hundred (100) accumulated minutes for the Drager units.

Course Structure:

1. Structure of the course is according to the number of students participating and their skill level.

Duration:

1. The minimum number of classroom and briefing hours is six (6).

In order to complete this course, students must:

1. Satisfactorily complete the TDI Rebreather Course written examination.
2. Complete all open water requirements safely and efficiently.
3. Demonstrate mature, sound judgment concerning dive planning and execution.

Qualifications of Graduates

Upon successful completion of this course, graduates may engage in no decompression diving activities utilizing the Dolphin to a maximum depth of forty (40) msw / one hundred thirty (130) feet, without decompression utilizing nitrox mixes not exceeding their level of certification.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

Wednesday, July 04, 2007

Why Do Department Dive Teams Need Public Safety Training?



General Information about ERDI Training

A Typical Scenario:

It is 4 am when the dispatcher turns in the call for a car overturned in the river. Two local firemen who are also divers jump in a pick up truck loaded with the dive gear from yesterday's recreational diving and drive to the scene. Upon arriving they immediately suit up and jump into the river to effect rescue. As soon as they step into the water they notice that the current is much faster than they expected and that the water is much colder.

The first diver uses the current and drifts to the car and grabs on, the second diver follows. The first diver crawls inside the open passenger door to search for the victim. As the second diver reaches the car his recreational gear becomes entangled. His weight causes the car to shift and roll in the current. He travels down stream in the current and catches an overhanging tree branch. The first diver is effectively trapped in the car only three feet from the surface. When public safety officials arrive they immediately commence a surface rescue procedure to retrieve the second would be rescuer from the tree branch. They also called for a dive team from a neighboring county to rescue the diver in the car.

Unfortunately by the time the dive team arrives their rescue is a body recovery. The driver of the car comes back to the scene with the Highway Patrol Officer just as they pull the body of the first diver from the water. The driver had escaped from the vehicle and walked to a neighboring house to call the Highway Patrol.

The efforts of these well intentioned but under trained divers resulted in a needless fatality and putting numerous other professionals at needless risk. The scene portrayed here is fiction, but, scenes like it happen every year. The reason is not really a lack of training, that is a symptom. The real reason is the failure of administrators to realize the need for specialized training and equipment in the field of Public Safety Diving.

Before starting a dive team, each department must weigh the cost of accomplishing the task properly versus the benefit for the community. What will your community gain? Are other resources available to accomplish the same goals. If you decide a dive team is necessary then please decide to adequately equip and train that team. This information will give you the questions you should ask about the training you will receive.

Do you need Public Safety Training?

Diving is a specialized activity taking place in a hazardous environment. That is why even recreational divers require certification to access equipment, air fills and dive sites. That recreational certification (called open water) qualifies divers to dive in reasonably calm, clear conditions at depths not to exceed 60 feet. In the recreational diving industry that certification is frequently referred to as a permit to learn, just as a learner's permit is issued to a person completing high school drivers education. We do not allow the learning permitee to drive without supervision, much less operate an emergency vehicle in route to an accident or fire scene. Yet many departments feel that open water training qualifies the diver to dive in the hazardous environments encountered by the Public Safety Dive Team.

Many teams have fallen victim to the Rescue Diver Certification farce. Recognizing the need for additional training the administrator seeks out "professional assistance" from the local dive store. The dive store instructor provides all that he is able to provide, a recreational certification as a Rescue Diver. Most recreational training agencies define their Rescue Diver Course as a self and buddy rescue program. This is adequate for helping your buddy who gets in trouble at 45 feet on the coral reef in the Keys, but not much assistance in the Public Safety Environment.

The diving environment qualifies in every area as a HAZMAT site. Add fuels and oils from a submerged vehicle and we have put multiple hazardous chemicals around the diver. Additionally, those chemicals will destroy the divers life support system if they are inadequate for the job. Place the diver inside the vehicle to do a recovery and we have added confined space rescue in a HAZMAT environment to the picture.

How many department administrators would take a person off the street with no formal training and place them in that situation above water?

Applied to other areas, imagine taking a person off the sidewalk handing them bunker gear and sending them into a burning building or sending a person to do hostage negotiation with only the information found in over the counter magazines. Yet, almost daily departments do just that with department dive team members or even bystanders that happen to dive. Is this an invitation to disaster? Should you ask the members of your department to accept or even volunteer to be a part of this potential disaster?

So how do you select and understand the type of training you are getting?

When contracting the initial training for your dive team you will probably be limited to two sources - sport certification instructors and agencies that specialize in training public safety divers. The other limited but possible resource is technical agency instructors with specialized experience in rescue operations. The advantage to sport instruction is cost and availability. The drawback is an instructional program which generally prohibits the training of professional diving activities or any diving activity outside the traditional recreational limits. The training focuses on avoiding the situations the public safety diver will encounter on 90% of all calls. Additionally the instructor probably lacks any public safety experience.

From a liability perspective, this may place the department in an indefensible position if training is questioned. From a safety perspective we have created an accident waiting for a scene. These factors are addressed by hiring public safety diving instructional specialist with verifiable credentials and experience. The drawback is availability, since local resources frequently don't exist. That lack of availability will probably increase cost. The department must decide if the increased safety and reduced liability are worth a few extra dollars. That is part of the team's obligation.

How do you qualify the instructor?

The first question to ask is what are the instructor’s qualifications?

What technical, rescue or public safety diving certification courses can the instructor teach?

Are those courses certified through a recreational training agency?

If so, does the agency also endorse the training of professional public safety divers?

Is the training NFPA and OSHA compliant (not compliant with some perceived provisional exemption!)?

Next, contact the certifying agency of the instructor. Ascertain:

1) Does the agency endorse the training of professional or commercial divers for Public Safety Operations;

2) Does the instructor’s insurance cover him for teaching these types of activities;

3) If the agency finds that their training is questioned in court does the certifying agency have any training standard or provision which would indicate the Public Safety Diver was diving beyond the realm of his certification and training; and

4) You may also want to verify the certification level and reputation of the specific instructor with whom you are dealing.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

ERDI Course Options

ERDI Diver Level Courses

ERD I
ERD II

ERDI Non-Diver Level Course
ERD Tender

ERDI (Operations) OPS Component Courses

ERD Drysuit OPS
ERD Full Face Mask OPS
ERD Ice Diving OPS
ERD Confined Space OPS
ERD Night OPS
ERD Small Boat OPS
ERD Surface Supplied OPS

ERDI Leadership Course

ERD Supervisor

ERDI Professional Courses

ERD Instructor
ERD OPS Components Instructor
ERD Instructor Trainer

2008 Technical Diving Conference

Still Room Available for the 2008 Technical Diving Conference

Just an update to let you know that there are still spaces available for the first-ever Technical Diving Conference hosted by DAN on January 18-19, 2008 in Durham, NC.

The conference will feature four half-day workshops covering an agenda that includes topics on physiology, decompression, rebreathers and training, and two evenings featuring dinner presentations on wreck and cave penetrations. Discussions will include the operational and medical aspects of technical diving, and the forum will also address ways to improve effectiveness and safety.

Throughout the conference, the workshops, discussions, panels and presentations will be conducted and led by global leaders in the technical diving field, including Simon Mitchell, Dr. Richard Vann, John Chatterton, Richie Kohler, and Jarrod Jablonski.

Early registration for the conference is $325; registrations must be received by Sept. 30, 2007. Any registrations received after that date will be charged the full fee of $425. Registration fees include access to all workshops, conference-sponsored dinners and receptions, presentations and discussion forums, and a souvenir fleece jacket (retail value $75). Register at DAN.

There are still spaces available, but they’re going fast! If you have questions, would like additional information, or need assistance with the registration process, contact research@dan.duke.edu or call (919) 684-2948 x 260. We’ll see you in Durham!

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

Sunday, June 24, 2007

Become a Trained Cylinder Visual Inspector!!


Attention PSI Inspectors

In accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations Title 49 172.704(c) (ii) (2-4) recurrent training must be completed at least once every three years to be in compliance for Hazmat handling.

PSI/PCI Visual Inspection Training complies with this regulation by issuing training certificates valid for only three years, therefore you as a PSI/PCI trained inspector must comply by receiving recurrent training once every three years.

In order to purchase and use PSI Evidence of Inspection (EOI) stickers you must have current training (within the last 3 years).

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

EOI Sticker Dilemma Revisited

EOI Sticker Dilemma Revisited

By

Bill High, PSI


Can you defend the statement printed on your evidence of inspection (EOI) sticker? Take a moment, look at what is written; study what is stated and what is implied. Do you perform what is written and do you inspect to gas industry standards? I have, over the past 15 years written several articles and lectured frequently on the importance of what is written on inspection stickers and the need to be trained. Many self-proclaimed inspectors as well as some trained inspectors have ignored important warnings.

The significance of sticker wording and training became a relevant issue in a civil lawsuit several years ago. A cylinder ruptured and questions by the plaintiff’s attorney were asked about the quality and visual inspection completeness. The sticker wording (this cylinder was inspected inside and found free of significant corrosion. Valid for one year) made the task of defending the inspector difficult. Can you visualize why?

A similar lawsuit settled in 2005 at great financial loss to the inspector was partly due to his use of an EOI sticker that, by it’s wording, made it clear his inspection was both inadequate and incomplete. His case was also diminished by his failure to have documented formal inspector training.

Visual inspection is a technical, objective assessment of a cylinder’s condition and its suitability for continued service. The EOI sticker applied by the inspector should be a statement as to the standards followed, identify who performed the inspection and when the inspection was performed. Those standards should be in written form and on hand at the inspection site.

In the first paragraph of this article I urged you to look at your EOI sticker. Does it only state “inspected to CGA C6? If that sticker is applied to an aluminum cylinder then the inspector has stated the cylinder was inspected to standards for steel cylinders not aluminum. Does your sticker say valid for one year? If so, you have implied a one year service guarantee. Can you even approximate that once out of your control, the cylinder will be serviceable and safe for one year? A common sticker legend states: inspected to dive industry standards. Ok, does the inspector have a copy of those standards? Not likely as there is no dive industry standard except for the PSI inspection protocol. Only the PSI inspector training and inspection standard is recognized by the US Department of Transportation (DOT), Transport Canada (TC) and cylinder manufacturers. Even the Compressed Gas Association refers to the PSI training and inspection manuals.

When an inspector applies an EOI sticker, he/she must understand the standard used and be prepared to prove the inspection was conducted according to the standard(s) listed. A written, detailed inspection report is the best proof of a complete technical inspection. CGA documents often become law by reference and although they are usually general in the subject matter, if you say you inspect to that standard you best have a copy of it and know its contents. CGA C6 is a guide for steel cylinders while the C6.1 provides guidance for aluminum cylinder inspection. C6.2 provides specific instructions for visual inspection of composite cylinders.

Dive stores often use a sticker that advertises the business as well as lists the inspection standard and month of inspection. When more than one inspector uses those stickers, it is not possible to identify the actual inspector. If later, there is a problem with that cylinder, those who did NOT handle the cylinder will want to be eliminated from scrutiny. Provisions should be made to identify the actual inspector.

Can you find fault with the following selection of EOI sticker legends?

(1) Inspected to gas industry standards and found free of significant rust or corrosion.

(2) Inspected and found free of significant corrosion. Valid for one year.

(3) The inside of this cylinder has been visually inspected and is good for 1 year from date marked.

(4) This tank has passed a visual inspection which conforms to standards set by the dive industry. This certificate valid for 1 year from date punched.

(5) Visual Inspection Certificate. This certificate valid for 1 year from date punched.

(6) This tank met or exceeded all standards of the diving program and pamphlet C-6 of the Compressed Gas Association at time of inspection (used on 3AL cylinders).

Lets look closely at a popular sticker legend. This tank has been visually tested in accordance with all regulations of the Department of Transportation and was found to be free of visible defects on the test date shown. First, visual inspection is generally not considered to be a test but rather an examination. The DOT regulations offer very little in the way of inspection guidelines. A person reading only the Code of Federal Regulations will not find the information necessary to be a quality visual inspector. Does the person using this sticker have a copy of the most current Title 49 codes? The Compressed Gas Association is a recognized source for inspection information although its manuals are often general in nature to cover a wide variety of cylinder types.

Most scuba cylinders have some corrosion damage or other abuse appearing on the cylinder after the first year of service. Therefore, very few cylinders are “found to be free of visible defects”. A properly trained inspector will determine that damage found is within the manufacturer’s prescribed allowable limits and the cylinder remains suitable for continued service.

Some DOT regulations do have specific inspection references to certain scuba cylinders. DOT states cylinders made from 6351 alloy should be inspected annually by a TRAINED inspector. Also, the E12479 scuba cylinder MUST be inspected annually by a PSI trained inspector. Visual inspectors with formal, documented training recognized by the cylinder manufactures will be most defendable.

If you, as a high-pressure cylinder visual inspector want to have a high level of defensibility then you MUST:

(1) Be trained for the cylinder types you inspect and be current (at least every three years) in your training;

(2) Possess and understand a printed copy of the standards that you follow, and ensure those standards are recognized by the cylinder manufacturers;

(3) Never allow unauthorized persons access to your EOI stickers; and

(4) Use an EOI sticker with a legend that truly represents the type of inspection performed.

Cylinder inspectors, handlers and owners are encouraged to visit the PSI, Inc. website (www.psicylinders.com) for additional information on scuba cylinder inspection and safety.

The author, Bill High is President of PSI, Inc. the only Federally recognized, full service cylinder inspector training corporation.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.

DAN Instructor Qualification Course (IQC)


DAN Training and Education

As a DAN Instructor, you can offer your students nine classes that will help make them safer divers.

These classes are:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies

Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries

Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving

Automated External Defibrillators for Aquatic Emergencies

Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals

Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen (REMO2™)

On-Site Neurological Assessment for Divers

Diving First Aid for Professional Divers

Diving Emergency Management Provider Program


DAN Instructors are scuba diving educators who want to offer dive safety programs to their students. To become a DAN Instructor, you must participate in a DAN Instructor Qualification Course (IQC).

The IQC follows a modular format. There is a Core Module and then a separate module representing each training program. You can take all nine modules as part of one course, or just take the Core Module and one course module - whatever you are interested in teaching. Later, as long as you remain a current and active DAN Instructor, you can take additional modules without retaking the Core Module. The Core Module is now available online.

Prerequisites for DAN Instructor Qualification Course:

DAN Member
Active scuba diving educator*
Current CPR Instructor
Documentation of First Aid training

Prerequisites for DAN IQC Modules:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

CPR Instructor

Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies

CPR Instructor

Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Instructor

First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries

CPR Instructor

Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving

CPR Instructor

Automated External Defibrillators for Aquatic Emergencies

Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving Instructor

Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals

CPR Training

Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen (REMO2™)

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Instructor

On-Site Neurological Assessment for Divers

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Instructor

Dive Accident First Aid for Non-Divers

To offer this program, DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors must be in Active Teaching Status for:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries
Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving

Diving First Aid for Professional Divers

To qualify, the candidate must:

Have an affiliation with an aquarium, scientific diving program, public safety diving program or a commercial diving operation
Be a CPR Instructor
Be a current DAN Member

Current DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors who are certified to teach Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries, AEDs for Scuba Diving and First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries, and who meet the other criteria, may complete an online crossover to be certified in this program as well.

Diving Emergency Management Provider

To offer this program, DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors must be in Active Teaching Status for:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries
Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving

Preferred Additional Credentials:
Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Take the Core Module Online

* Note about the scuba diving educator requirement: Any scuba diving instructor or assistant instructor with a recognized scuba training organization can attend the IQC. A divemaster/divecon who is also a CPR and First Aid instructor with a recognized training agency can also attend the IQC.

Course Objective

The DAN Instructor Qualification Course (IQC) trains and educates qualified scuba diving educators to plan, manage, conduct and promote dive safety through DAN Training Programs such as the Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries course, the Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen (REMO2™) course, the Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving and the First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries course along with the Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies course.

In addition, the course develops role-model teaching techniques in the use of first aid for suspected dive injuries. Instructor Candidates also have the opportunity to develop further knowledge in relation to the special considerations involved in providing emergency first aid.

The DAN IQC consists of eight modules. There is a core module that introduces DAN and the DAN Training philosophy. This core program serves as the introduction for all other DAN Training programs. The remaining program modules represent each of the individual training courses offered by DAN. Qualified Instructor Trainers can present all seven program modules or select only the modules appropriate for the Instructor Candidates.

Qualifications of DAN Instructors

Successful completion of the DAN Instructor Qualification Course (IQC) results in certification recognizing the Instructor Candidate's understanding and performance of the knowledge and skills contained within this program.

Instructors must maintain active teaching status with DAN in order to conduct DAN Training programs. In order to maintain active teaching status, DAN Instructors must teach or assist with teaching each course they are certified in once within a 24-month period.

Recommended Minimum Hours of Training

Knowledge and Skills Development

Core Module: 4 Hours
Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Module: 2-3 Hours
Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies Module: 2-3 Hours
Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries: 1-2 Hours
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries Module: 2-3 Hours
Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving: 1-2 Hours
Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals: 8 Hours
Remote Emergency Medical Oxygen Module: 1-2 Hours

The time the course actually takes to teach varies depending upon many factors, including the number of students and their ability to process the educational components of the program along with the number of modules offered. Instructor Trainers desiring to include subjects or training beyond the course requirements may do so only before or following the course. Any additional training must not be required for completion of course requirements.

Required Curriculum Subject Areas

The Instructor Trainer must ensure Instructor Candidate familiarity with each of the following subject areas:

Knowledge Development

Core Module


What is DAN?
DAN Training Methodology
Role of the DAN Instructor
General Standards and Procedures for All DAN Training Programs
Marketing DAN Training Programs
Disease Transmission
Oxygen and AED Equipment/Safety
First Aid Equipment

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Course Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies Course Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development
O2 Resuscitation Systems (MTV and BVM)
Providing Advanced Oxygen First Aid
Recommendations for Advanced Oxygen Providers and equipment use
Skills Development
CPR Review
Resuscitation with an MTV
Resuscitation with a BVM

First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals

Knowledge and Skills Development categories
Initial Assessment
Airway management
Breathing and ventilation
Circulation
Including AED use
Control of bleeding
Shock management
Ongoing Assessment

REMO2™ Course Module

Manual Overview - Standards and Procedures
Knowledge Development Session
Overview
Topics
Skills Development Session
Overview
Use of Scenarios
Injured Diver Scenarios
Teaching Exercise

Diving Emergency Management Provider

To offer this program, DAN Instructor Trainers and Instructors must be in Active Teaching Status for:

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries
Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for Scuba Diving

Preferred Additional Credentials:
DAN Advanced Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

Examination

General Standards and Procedures Exam - 20 Questions
Module Exams - 10 Questions Each

Course Summary

The Instructor Trainer must ensure that the Instructor Candidate is able to successfully demonstrate the ability to perform the required skills for each certified program in a role model fashion.

Please email omnidive@omnidivers.com if you are interested or want additional information.